Tag Archives: Number of Conditions and Condition Setting

Fixing Broken Lenses: Toward Humanistic Practice in Probation

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Massachusetts Trial Court Offers Evidence-Based Best Sentencing Practices

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The Massachusetts Trial Court departments that have a major role in sentencing have produced sentencing best practices documents. This is a significant achievement. Here is an article describing the key Best Practice Principles. They are the product of more than a year of hard work by broad-based committees and are extraordinary data-driven consensus best practices recommendations for judges and practitioners.  Here is the Superior Court PDF including the Best Practice Principles and Commentary, and the website for all of the documents.

Shorter, More Targeted Probation Terms?

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Here’s a National Institute of Corrections article that has many useful and well accepted concepts. These include Risk, Needs and Responsivity and other best practices. These are difficult to implement in a probation resource-poor environment. Also note on page 15 that the probation terms cited as examples of best practices are a year or shorter. The focus of the article is dosage probation which is supported by drilling down into the probationer’s circumstances and implementing zero-based probation condition setting; set only probation conditions for which the need/responsivity for which is firmly established.

National Institute of Corrections Dosage Probation Article Carter Sankovitz Center for Effective Public Policy

Modern Electronic Supervision vs. Incarceration

monitoring-1305045_1280This article (book chapter) has broader application than the title would suggest because it seems to be about a lot more than just electronic monitoring. The author argues that the data strongly recommends shifting a large segment of the jail and prison population to non-incarceration correctional choices.

James Byrne on Smart Sentencing Revisited Research on Electronic Monitoring

Courtesy of James M. Byrne, Professor, School of Criminology and Justice Studies, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, a chapter in Blomberg, Thomas, Julie Mestre Brancale, Kevin Beaver, and Bales, William, Editors ( forthcoming) Advancing Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (Routledge Publishers)