Tag Archives: Incarceration

Public Health Approach to Incarceration

121212.jpgThis is an interesting article from the University of Wisconsin – Madison, Institute for Research on Poverty. It gives a public health approach to incarceration, one that is a bit different than those of us in criminal justice system are used to. Here are some quotes:

“. . . Research also shows that even after accounting for material hardships occurring before imprisonment, paternal incarceration strongly increases material hardships for the incarcerated father’s family, defined as experiencing things like having the electricity turned off or not having enough money to make rent.”

“. . . Even when controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, and familial characteristics, parental incarceration is independently linked to a number or poor health outcomes for children, including learning disabilities, behavioral or conduct problems, and developmental delays. . .”

Incarceration prevention includes problem-solving courts and evidence-based probation and parole including the HOPE program.

“Use more nuanced sentencing strategies . . . revise policy decisions [imposing mandatory minimums and elimination of parole] . . . [reduce} the potential punishment of drug offenders and [make it retroactive], and [commute sentences].

Here’s the full article.

What Caused the Crime Decline?

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This small to medium-sized 2015 PDF-book from the Brennan Center at New York University subjects the possible causes of the large crime decline to a multi-variable regression analysis. It suggests that increases in incarceration will not reduce crime, and that the historical crime decline of the last 30 years is due to many factors: What Caused the Crime Decline? (2015) by Roeder, Eisen and Bowling

Moderate Effects of Incarceration on the Crime Rate

prison-370112_960_720This study is one of a number which suggest only a moderate impact of incarceration on the crime rate:

Reconsidering Incarceration: New Directions for Reducing Crime by Don Stemem, Vera Institute of Justice

Modern Electronic Supervision vs. Incarceration

monitoring-1305045_1280This article (book chapter) has broader application than the title would suggest because it seems to be about a lot more than just electronic monitoring. The author argues that the data strongly recommends shifting a large segment of the jail and prison population to non-incarceration correctional choices.

James Byrne on Smart Sentencing Revisited Research on Electronic Monitoring

Courtesy of James M. Byrne, Professor, School of Criminology and Justice Studies, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, a chapter in Blomberg, Thomas, Julie Mestre Brancale, Kevin Beaver, and Bales, William, Editors ( forthcoming) Advancing Criminology and Criminal Justice Policy (Routledge Publishers)